Quick Facts About Infertility

Quick Facts About Infertility

  • Infertility is NOT an inconvenience; it is a disease of the reproductive system that impairs the body’s ability to perform the basic function of reproduction.

  • Impaired fecundity (the inability to have a child) affects 6.7 million women in the U.S. — about 11% of the reproductive-age population (Source: National Survey of Family Growth, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) 2006-2010).

  • In a survey of married women, the CDC found that 1.5 million women in the US (6%) are infertile (Source: National Survey of Family Growth, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) 2006-2010).

  • Twenty-five percent of infertile couples have more than one factor that contributes to their infertility.

  • In approximately 40 percent of infertile couples, the male partner is either the sole cause or a contributing cause of infertility.

  • In approximately 40 percent of infertile couples, the female partner is either the sole cause or a contributing cause of infertility.

  • Irregular or abnormal ovulation accounts for approximately 25 percent of all female infertility problems.

  • Most infertility cases — 85% to 90% — are treated with conventional medical therapies such as medication or surgery.

  • While vital for some patients, in vitro fertilization and similar treatments account for less than 3% of infertility services, and about (or approximately) seven hundredths of one percent (0.07%) of U.S. health care costs.

  • Twelve percent of all infertility cases are a result of the woman either weighing too little or too much.

  • It is possible for women with body weight disorders to reverse their infertility by attaining and maintaining a healthy weight.

  • Men and Women who smoke have decreased fertility. The risk of miscarriage is higher for pregnant women who smoke. Up to 13 percent of female infertility is caused by cigarette smoking.

  • Chlamydia causes about 4 to 5 million infections annually in the United States. If left untreated, chlamydia can cause infertility.

Source: American Society for Reproductive Medicine

For more information or to schedule an appointment with our physician, please contact our office at (937) 458-5084.

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When To See a Specialist?

When To See a Specialist?

Deciding when to see a fertility specialist can be complicated. We’ve created a short quiz to help.

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Question 1 / 6

Are you a heterosexual couple that has tried to conceive for over 6 months?

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Are you a single person trying to conceive?

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Question 3 / 6

Are you a same sex couple trying to conceive?

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Question 4 / 6

Do you have any genetic concerns?

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Question 5 / 6

Do you have irregular menstrual cycles or ovulatory problems?

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Question 6 / 6

Are you a patient where male factor infertility is present?

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