Quick Facts About Infertility

Resources

  • Infertility is NOT an inconvenience; it is a disease of the reproductive system that impairs the body’s ability to perform the basic function of reproduction.

  • Impaired fecundity (the inability to have a child) affects 6.7 million women in the U.S. — about 11% of the reproductive-age population (Source: National Survey of Family Growth, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) 2006-2010).

  • In a survey of married women, the CDC found that 1.5 married million women in the US (6%) are infertile (Source: National Survey of Family Growth, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) 2006-2010).

  • Twenty-five percent of infertile couples have more than one factor that contributes to their infertility.

  • In approximately 40 percent of infertile couples, the male partner is either the sole cause or a contributing cause of infertility.

  • In approximately 40 percent of infertile couples, the female partner is either the sole cause or a contributing cause of infertility.

  • Irregular or abnormal ovulation accounts for approximately 25 percent of all female infertility problems.

  • Most infertility cases — 85% to 90% — are treated with conventional medical therapies such as medication or surgery.

  • While vital for some patients, in vitro fertilization and similar treatments account for less than 3% of infertility services, and approximately 0.07% of U.S. health care costs.

  • Twelve percent of all infertility cases are a result of the woman either weighing too little or too much.

  • It is possible for women with body weight disorders to reverse their infertility by attaining and maintaining a healthy weight.

  • Men and women who smoke have decreased fertility. The risk of miscarriage is higher for pregnant women who smoke. Up to 13 percent of female infertility is caused by cigarette smoking.

  • Chlamydia causes about 4 to 5 million infections annually in the United States. If left untreated, chlamydia can cause infertility.

Source: American Society for Reproductive Medicine

For more information or to schedule an appointment with our physician, please contact our office at (937) 458-5084.

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Dear SpringCreek Family and Friends:

Unfortunately, COVID cases are on the rise.

As of March 1, 2022, here are the updated COVID guidelines:

  • Regardless of vaccination status, everyone must wear a mask inside the building.
  • Temperature and COVID status should be reported for each SpringCreek associate, patient, and visitor.
  • Patients should remain in their car until a SpringCreek associate calls them in for their appointment. The check-in person will call patients in accordance with appointment times while maintaining appropriate spacing in the waiting room and based on the needs of the office. Please contact our office for special arrangements, as there is limited capacity in the waiting room.

SpringCreek Fertility will continue to revise our policy to ensure we are parallel to the CDC recommendations.

Feel free to call our office at 937-458-5084 if you have any questions or concerns.

We are here for you!